jtotheizzoe:

This pi may be old, but it’s still delicious.  

Gah, I love vintage Coronet Instructional Films. You can watch the whole Coronet archive here, for free!

via okkultmotionpictures:

Happy OKKULT Pi Day


EXCERPTS >|< Meaning Of Pi (1949)


 | Hosted at: Internet Archive
 | From: A/V Geek Film Archive
 | Download: Ogg | h.264 | MPEG4
 | Digital Copy: Public Domain Mark 1.0

A series of Animated GIFs excerpted from Meaning of Pi (1949). The video Explains how pi denotes the ratio of a circle to its diameter, shows the use of circles in art, industry and commerce, outlines a procedure by which the numerical value of pi can be checked and reviewed, and describes the discovery and importance of pi.

We invite you to watch the full video HERE


Excerpts by OKKULT Motion Pictures: a collection of GIFs excerpted from open source/unknown/rare/controversial moving images.
A digital curation project for the diffusion of open knowledge.

>|<

(via crookedindifference)




mentalflossr:

18 Things You Didn’t Learn in History Class
Lord Byron kept a pet bear in his college dorm room.

mentalflossr:

18 Things You Didn’t Learn in History Class

Lord Byron kept a pet bear in his college dorm room.


(via brianvan)


Education is what people do to you, learning is what you do to yourself.
MIT Media Lab director Joi Ito at #TED2014. Pair with this excellent read on how to fuel the lifelong engine of learning beyond formal education.  (via explore-blog)

ilovecharts:

Originally appeared on I Love Charts on Medium

ilovecharts:

Originally appeared on I Love Charts on Medium


thekidshouldseethis:

In 1961, an interactive exhibition called Mathematica: A World of Numbers… and Beyond inaugurated the new science wing at Los Angeles’ California Museum of Science and Industry. Sponsored by IBM, it was an innovative exhibit designed by husband and wife team Charles and Ray Eames, and lucky for us, it included five short animations that explored a handful of math concepts. Watch three of our favorites:

Above, 2ⁿ – “a story about the exponential growth of numbers raised to powers.” Below, Symmetry and testing for degrees of it:

Also, Topology – how a closed curve dissects a plane into inside and outside sections:

And in the archives, don’t miss this iconic Eames film: Powers of Ten.

via Tinybop.


For almost 18 years you’re taught to sit down, shut up, and raise your hand. Then you have to decide what you’re going to do for the rest of your life.
Lavon Curtis (via wanduring)

(via proof)


theatlantic:

Our new issue is out now! Pick up a copy, read some of the articles on our site, or stay tuned throughout the day for excerpts on our Tumblr.

theatlantic:

Our new issue is out now! Pick up a copy, read some of the articles on our site, or stay tuned throughout the day for excerpts on our Tumblr.


theatlantic:

What College Graduates Regret

Half wish they’d gotten more work experience while still in school.
Read more. [Image quinn.anya/Flickr]

theatlantic:

What College Graduates Regret

Half wish they’d gotten more work experience while still in school.

Read more. [Image quinn.anya/Flickr]


theatlantic:

Down With Textbooks

When it comes to teaching history, nothing destroys student interest faster and more completely than a heavy reliance on textbooks.
During my first three years of teaching high-school history I would see students’ eyes glaze over as we reviewed from a 1,000 page textbook. Five years later, I don’t blame them. So much is wrong with history textbooks, I hardly know where to begin, but here is my short list.
Textbooks present history as unchanging, but as time passes, our understanding and interpretation of the past constantly evolves.
Textbooks are one-sided, offering a top-down, often white-male-centric view of history.  
Without a thesis or any semblance or argument, textbooks don’t accurately reflect how most scholars (at least good ones) write and present history. Teachers should assign readings that model effective historical writing.
Most importantly—and this merits repeating—textbooks are boring and intimidating.
Textbooks can serve as a crutch for teachers who don’t know history or the historian’s craft.
Read more. [Image: Amy Conn-Gutierrez/AP Photo]

theatlantic:

Down With Textbooks

When it comes to teaching history, nothing destroys student interest faster and more completely than a heavy reliance on textbooks.

During my first three years of teaching high-school history I would see students’ eyes glaze over as we reviewed from a 1,000 page textbook. Five years later, I don’t blame them. So much is wrong with history textbooks, I hardly know where to begin, but here is my short list.

  1. Textbooks present history as unchanging, but as time passes, our understanding and interpretation of the past constantly evolves.
  2. Textbooks are one-sided, offering a top-down, often white-male-centric view of history.  
  3. Without a thesis or any semblance or argument, textbooks don’t accurately reflect how most scholars (at least good ones) write and present history. Teachers should assign readings that model effective historical writing.
  4. Most importantly—and this merits repeating—textbooks are boring and intimidating.
  5. Textbooks can serve as a crutch for teachers who don’t know history or the historian’s craft.

Read more. [Image: Amy Conn-Gutierrez/AP Photo]