thehipperelement:

Black Swan: Could this type of thinking improve how you design solutions?


We must reckon with the fact that pop culture really likes to be agreeable along with its thrills. It likes to say yes, and makes endless conciliations to do so. It is safer to say yes. Yes can be deeply pleasurable. History is made by those who say no.

The trouble with pop. Or, as Bertrand Russell put it in his 10 timeless commandments for learning and life“Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.”

Pair with this illuminating read on why being universally liked ensures mediocrity, not greatness

(HT The Paris Review)


academiccoachtaylor:

Academic Coach Taylor knows what it takes to succeed. 

academiccoachtaylor:

Academic Coach Taylor knows what it takes to succeed. 

(via arabellesicardi)




npr:

"I went to a four-year university." "That job requires a one-year certificate." "It’s a two-semester course." "She’s a fifth-year senior." What do these expressions have in common? They use time as the yardstick for higher education.
Essentially, this means measuring not how much you’ve learned, but how long you’ve spent trying to learn it.
The conventions of the credit hour, the semester and the academic year were formalized in the early 1900s. Time forms the template for designing college programs, accrediting them and — crucially — funding them using federal student aid.
But in 2013, for the first time, the Department of Education took steps to loosen the rules.
The new idea: Allow institutions to get student-aid funding by creating programs that directly measure learning, not time. Students can move at their own pace. The school certifies — measures — what they know and are able to do.
Competency-Based Education: No More Semesters?
Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR

npr:

"I went to a four-year university." "That job requires a one-year certificate." "It’s a two-semester course." "She’s a fifth-year senior." What do these expressions have in common? They use time as the yardstick for higher education.

Essentially, this means measuring not how much you’ve learned, but how long you’ve spent trying to learn it.

The conventions of the credit hour, the semester and the academic year were formalized in the early 1900s. Time forms the template for designing college programs, accrediting them and — crucially — funding them using federal student aid.

But in 2013, for the first time, the Department of Education took steps to loosen the rules.

The new idea: Allow institutions to get student-aid funding by creating programs that directly measure learning, not time. Students can move at their own pace. The school certifies — measures — what they know and are able to do.

Competency-Based Education: No More Semesters?

Illustration credit: LA Johnson/NPR



ilovecharts:

Few things are more important than making sure we provide every child with a first-class education.
President Obama has championed a number of policies that are helping more kids graduate from high school than ever before. School Improvement Grants are turning around “dropout factories,” or schools that graduate less than 60% of their students. We’re also on our way to connecting 99% of schools to high-speed internet through the President’s Connect Ed initiative. And by “schools,” I mean every seat in every classroom.
I’m a policy wonk, but I’m also a mom who is relieved, proud, and encouraged that the Administration’s work and the hard work of all Americans to bring our economy back from the brink of collapse is succeeding. I hope that these charts are as encouraging to you as they are to me. We have more work to do, but we do it knowing that we have come a long way over the last 6 years.
Thanks for following along! It’s be a lot of fun.
- Cecilia

ilovecharts:

Few things are more important than making sure we provide every child with a first-class education.

President Obama has championed a number of policies that are helping more kids graduate from high school than ever before. School Improvement Grants are turning around “dropout factories,” or schools that graduate less than 60% of their students. We’re also on our way to connecting 99% of schools to high-speed internet through the President’s Connect Ed initiative. And by “schools,” I mean every seat in every classroom.

I’m a policy wonk, but I’m also a mom who is relieved, proud, and encouraged that the Administration’s work and the hard work of all Americans to bring our economy back from the brink of collapse is succeeding. I hope that these charts are as encouraging to you as they are to me. We have more work to do, but we do it knowing that we have come a long way over the last 6 years.

Thanks for following along! It’s be a lot of fun.

- Cecilia



  1. The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri
  2. Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
  3. City of Glass by Paul Auster
  4. Rule of the Bone by Russell Banks
  5. How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

Five of the 57 books on beloved MTV animated heroine Daria’s reading list

Pair with the reading lists of  Carl SaganAlan TuringNick Cave,  David Bowie, Brian Eno, and Leo Tolstoy

(via explore-blog)


theweekmagazine:

Inside the ISIS school curriculum

The extremist education agenda bans music, sports, and more